Testosterone decanoate profile

While we are familiar with the Propionate ester the remaining three esters that create Sustanon-250 are almost always found as part of a mixture or compounded anabolic androgenic steroid .

Developed by Organon, the original idea behind Sustanon-250 was to provide a testosterone form well-suited for hormone replacement therapy that would only needed to be administered once every few weeks and for all intense purposes the idea was a success. For the performance enhancing athlete Sustanon-250 can be a fine choice but the idea of injecting only once or twice a month is not applicable here. As a performance enhancer this testosterone like all forms will need to be administered on a more frequent basis. This mixture carries with it two fast, short esters, Propionate and Pheylpropionate, a longer more moderate ester Isocaproate and the very slow and long Decanoate ester. In order to keep testosterone levels stable and at their peak most athletes will inject Sustanon-250 at a minimum of every 3 days and more commonly every other day for optimal results.



For more info see: Sustanon-250

Testosterone, like many anabolic steroids, was classified as a controlled substance in 1991. Testosterone is administered parenterally in normal and delayed-release (depot) forms. In September 1995, the FDA approved testosterone transdermal patches (Androderm), and many transdermal forms and brands are now available including implants, gels, and topical solutions. A testosterone buccal system, Striant, was FDA-approved in July 2003; Striant is a mucoadhesive product that adheres to the buccal mucosa and provides a controlled and sustained release of testosterone. In May 2014, the FDA approved an intranasal gel formulation of testosterone (Natesto). A transdermal patch (Intrinsa) for hormone replacement in women is under investigation; the daily dosages used in women are much lower than for products used in males. The FDA refused approval for Intrinsa in 2004 stating that more data regarding safety, especially in relation to cardiovascular and breast health, were required.

All anabolic steroids have a tendency to reduce HDL (good) cholesterol and increase LDL (bad) cholesterol. The relative impact of an anabolic/androgenic steroid on serum lipids is dependant on the dose, route of administration (oral vs. injectable) type of steroid (aromatizable or non-aromatizable) and level of resistance to hepatic metabolism. With regards to nandrolone at a dose of 600mg per week over 10 weeks demonstrated 26% reduction in HDL cholesterol levels. This suppression is slightly greater than an equal dose of testosterone over an equal period. In other words it shows a slightly more negative impact on HDL/LDL ratio with nandrolone than with testosterone cypionate. It’s always recommended to accompany the use of this product with a low saturated fat diet and a cardiovascular exercise program.

Hypercalcemia may develop both spontaneously and as a result of androgen therapy in women with disseminated breast carcinoma.  If it develops while on this agent, the drug should be discontinued. Caution is required in administering these agents to patients with cardiac, renal or hepatic disease.  Cholestatic jaundice is associated with therapeutic use of anabolic and androgenic steroids.  Edema may occur occasionally with or without congestive heart failure.  Concomitant administration of adrenal steroids or ACTH may add to the edema.  In children, anabolic steroid treatment may accelerate bone maturation without producing compensatory gain in linear growth.  This adverse effect may result in compromised adult stature.  The younger the child the greater the risk of compromising final mature height.   The effect on bone maturation should be monitored by assessing bone age of the wrist and hand every six months.  This drug has not been shown to be safe and effective for the enhancement of athletic performance. Because of the potential risk of serious adverse health effects, this drug should not be used for such purpose.

Testosterone decanoate profile

testosterone decanoate profile

Hypercalcemia may develop both spontaneously and as a result of androgen therapy in women with disseminated breast carcinoma.  If it develops while on this agent, the drug should be discontinued. Caution is required in administering these agents to patients with cardiac, renal or hepatic disease.  Cholestatic jaundice is associated with therapeutic use of anabolic and androgenic steroids.  Edema may occur occasionally with or without congestive heart failure.  Concomitant administration of adrenal steroids or ACTH may add to the edema.  In children, anabolic steroid treatment may accelerate bone maturation without producing compensatory gain in linear growth.  This adverse effect may result in compromised adult stature.  The younger the child the greater the risk of compromising final mature height.   The effect on bone maturation should be monitored by assessing bone age of the wrist and hand every six months.  This drug has not been shown to be safe and effective for the enhancement of athletic performance. Because of the potential risk of serious adverse health effects, this drug should not be used for such purpose.

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